pepino-amoroso:

Neil and Cobie’s reaction to the final episode. (x)

#youcansethepainintheireyes
#thosetwolovedswarkles

2 hours ago • 28,615 notes • Reblog

The Federal Communications Commission will propose new rules that allow Internet service providers to offer a faster lane through which to send video and other content to consumers, as long as a content company is willing to pay for it, according to people briefed on the proposals.

The proposed rules are a complete turnaround for the F.C.C. on the subject of so-called net neutrality, the principle that Internet users should have equal ability to see any content they choose, and that no content providers should be discriminated against in providing their offerings to consumers.

The F.C.C.’s previous rules governing net neutrality were thrown out by a federal appeals court this year. The court said those rules had essentially treated Internet service providers as public utilities, which violated a previous F.C.C. ruling that Internet links were not to be governed by the same strict regulation as telephone or electric service.

The new rules, according to the people briefed on them, will allow a company like Comcast or Verizon to negotiate separately with each content company – like Netflix, Amazon, Disney or Google – and charge different companies different amounts for priority service.

That, of course, could increase costs for content companies, which would then have an incentive to pass on those costs to consumers as part of their subscription prices.

Proponents of net neutrality have feared that such a framework would empower large, wealthy companies and prevent small start-ups, which might otherwise be the next Twitter or Facebook, for example, from gaining any traction in the market.

F.C.C., in ‘Net Neutrality’ Turnaround, Plans to Allow Fast Lane - NYTimes.com

Goodbye, net neutrality.

(via dendroica)

2 hours ago • 66 notes • Reblog

justlearningasigo:

JESUS DUMBLEDORE FUCKING CHRIST

(Source: stupidfuckingquestions)

3 hours ago • 400,167 notes • Reblog

taikonaut:

I FUCKED UP.

DON’T LOOK AT ME.

(Source: grindlebone)

3 hours ago • 23,010 notes • Reblog

Imagine a vendor on the National Mall, selling burgers and dogs, who hasn’t paid his rent in 20 years. He refuses to recognize his landlord, the National Park Service, as a legitimate authority. Every court has ruled against him, and fines have piled up. What’s more, the effluents from his food cart are having a detrimental effect on the spring grass in the capital.

Would an armed posse come to his defense, aiming their guns at the park police? Would the lawbreaker get prime airtime on Fox News, breathless updates in the Drudge Report, a sympathetic ear from Tea Party Republicans? No, of course not.

So what’s the difference between the fictional loser and Cliven Bundy, the rancher in Nevada who owes the government about $1 million and has been grazing his cattle on public land for more than 20 years? Near as I can tell, one wears a cowboy hat.

Deadbeat on the Range - Timothy Egan, NYTimes.com (via thingspeopleasklibrarians)

3 hours ago • 116 notes • Reblog

asgardfeels:

#that awkward moment when you’re watching the movies with someone who doesn’t get why you’re cackling like a madman at these lines.

(Source: yunuen)

3 hours ago • 55,979 notes • Reblog

liberalsarecool:

US Workers Were Once Massacred Fighting for the Protections Being Rolled Back Today:

On April 20, 1914, the Colorado National Guard and a private militia employed by the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company (CF&I) opened fire on a tent camp of striking coal miners at Ludlow, Colo. At least 19 people died in the camp that day, mostly women and children.

A century later, the bloody incident might seem a relic of the distant past, but the Ludlow Massacre retains a powerful, disturbing and growing relevance to the present. After a century of struggling against powerful interests to make American workplaces safer and corporations responsive to their employees, the US is rapidly returning to the conditions of rampant exploitation that contributed to Ludlow.

Corporations HAVE ALWAYS and WILL ALWAYS be against the worker. Go back to any point in time and there is a worker being exploited.

Human rights and the environment under constant corporate attack assisted by conservatives. Just look at the Republican-appointed justices rolling back the decades of protective and prudent legislation to empower the billionaire corporate class.

(Source: billmoyers.com)

3 hours ago • 113 notes • Reblog
3 hours ago • 2,369 notes • Reblog

foxinu:

nsfwjynx:

the-pink-mist:

There was a split second there where his like, “wait, what? bro what are you doing?” 

On more serious note, PTSD dogs for veterans are so fucking therapeutic. They’re like the one person you can spill your guts to and never worry about ever being judged or have that secret divulged. There are times when I definitely prefer the company of a dog over a human. 

Therapy animals save lives.

These dogs are even still so much more amazing. They check rooms before their handler enters, so they can clear it to help the person feel safe. Like in the gif, they are there when panic attacks or nightmares occur, to be something for the person to help ground themselves on, or yes just to turn on the lights. Even more amazing, many people are able to reduce their medication when they have a PTSD service dog there to help them. These dogs are useful for not just veterans, but also victims of abuse, accident trauma, natural disasters, and others. Their training allows them to be useful in situations where medical assistance is needed, as well. Some PTSD dogs are trained to recognize repetitive behaviours in handlers, and signal the handler to break the repetition and stopping the behaviour and possibly injury. 

Service dogs in general are just awesome. Remember to respect any that you see out in public. They are not there for you to walk up to and play with, even the puppies!

3 hours ago • 84,690 notes • Reblog